Oliver + S

Tunic in knit, stretched out waist seam

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    Profile photo of KellyNYCKellyNYC @KellyNYC

    Hello! I just finished the Playtime tunic in an interlock knit, and used my serger for most seams, including attaching the bodice to the skirt. Now, I’m new to serging and new to knits, so perhaps I shouldn’t have used my serger for this seam, or taken other precautions. But it seems that this seam became stretched in the process of sewing it together as now it is about 2-3″ wider than the version I’d previously made in a woven. Any ideas what I did wrong, or if it’s possible to narrow the dress? The way the sleeves are attached would make it difficult to just narrow the side seams.

    Thank you

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    Profile photo of with love Heidiwith love Heidi @with love Heidi

    I don’t think this is uncommon with knits and yes I would have sewn it all on the overlocker as well πŸ™‚ I don’t think you’ve done anything wrong I think it is more to do with the nature of stretch fabric.

    Now to some potential solutions πŸ™‚ Have you steamed this seam? Sometimes a good shot of steam can help the knit fabric tighten up once it has been stretched, I use it a lot on neck bands. I’m not sure if this will work after the fact but adding some clear elastic to the seam on the inside, stretching it slightly to bring the seam back to its original length. Next time I would add the clear elastic or other stabiliser to the seam before adding the skirt portion, simular to stabilising the Hopscotch top and dress. And lastly how dose it look on? Is it an everyday dress or a going out dress? It it looks okay as is you might just want to leave it and move on to the next one πŸ™‚

    Hope you can work something out!

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    Profile photo of with love Heidiwith love Heidi @with love Heidi

    I have just had a similar experience with a beanie I am lining with jersey! The seams were stretched out and wavy πŸ™ but a thorough press and a little steam brought them back to a lovley non wavy state πŸ™‚

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    Profile photo of NicoleNicole @motherof5

    I have not made this yet and I am no expert in sewing knits.

    If I am sewing a gathered knit seam to a straight knit seam (like the front yoke of the Hopscotch shirt) I will stabilise the seam with a piece of soft interfacing (as Heidi suggested), sew with a traditional machine AND then neaten the raw edge.

    It just helps things stay in place.

    Often I will topstitch the seam in place afterwards.

    Personally, I find knit garments that I sew look better with a bit of standard machine top stitching. I use a long stitch. I find they look less homemade then garments made on my overlocker alone.

    Heidi is right about a good steamy press, it can do marvels, as can tossing it in the tumble dryer.

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    Profile photo of KellyNYCKellyNYC @KellyNYC

    Thank you both for your advice! I purchased the clear elastic and will be sure to use that next time on this seam, and the Hopscotch seam. Good tip. Tried the steam and it didn’t make a difference, but I’ll throw it through the dryer and that should help a bit. In any case, it does still look cute on. I just added a photo to the Flickr group. Nobody would likely notice except me. The seam joining the shoulder to the arms looks a bit low too. I think this pattern is supposed to be like that to an extent, but that area may have gotten stretched out as well. Oh well…it is still a cute and cozy dress!

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/kddonovan/10802504445/in/pool-oliverands

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    Profile photo of SherrySherry @mim22

    I can remember being told at a stretch sewing class, that if you use a woven pattern on stretch fabric it will come out larger and if its a stretch pattern used on woven fabric it will be much smaller. I think this is a pattern for woven material so that might account for the difference in size. Also did you serge on the edge, that would be a 1/4″ seam or sew 1/2″ seam. Just a thought.

    Your dress is adorable, love the fabric tried to buy some today but Fabricworm is out of stock (probably a good thing)

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