Oliver + S

Sewing Lessons

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    Profile photo of G + GG + G @kate_conley

    At school, my daughter (almost 8) has been wearing lots of the clothes I’ve sewn for her. She still thinks it’s cool I sew for her and she proudly tells her friends I made the clothes. Her friends are excited by the idea of making their own clothes and several moms have approached me, asking to offer sewing lessons for their girls. Has anyone else been approached about this? Are you doing it? Trying to figure out the logistics (group lessons or individual–I only have one machine and one serger, what to charge, etc.) Thinking it might be a nice way to earn a little extra cash w/o the pressure of selling my own sewing.

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    Profile photo of LucyMLucyM @LucyM

    Once you find the space to teach, require the students to bring their own machines. If they are going to sew, they will need their own equipment anyway. Also consider starting with hand sewing. Aprons, stitch samplers, doll clothes, pillows, all lend themselves nicely to hand sewing. Once they become familiar with the basics they will then be ready for the machine. Learning the hand sewing techniques will also give them time to source machines if they find that they enjoy sewing and decide to continue mastering the skill. I suspect group lessons will offer the potential to earn more money per time period than individual lessons. Your marginal cost (cost per lecture per student) decreases the more students you have at each lesson.

    This sounds like fun. I hope it works out for you.

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    Profile photo of G + GG + G @kate_conley

    Great ideas! I loved to hand sew (cross stitch, embroidery) when I was a girl–that is a great idea for a starting point!

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    Profile photo of MaggieMaggie @Maggie

    I bumped a similar thread to the top. Folks had a lot of good ideas.

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