Oliver + S

Insulating School Days Coat

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    sahmcolorado @sahmcolorado

    Hi All, I FINALLY got around to posting pics and explanation of how I added a layer of insulation to Clara’s School Days Coat. I had to review what I had done so I can make Oliver’s this week so I thought I’d share. You can find it here if you are interested: http://www.flickr.com/photos/sandiknowles/sets/72157625186448282/

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    Loralee @Loralee

    Thank you so much for posting! It really does look simple. I have the pattern and was going to try it in laminate first but now I’m thinking I should do this!! 🙂

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    Liesl Gibson
    Keymaster
    @liesl

    Thank you so much for posting these! That’s exactly how I lined S’s coat, too.

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    Rpankow @excytin

    Thanks for the photos Sandi, it’s so helpful to see first hand what someone actually did. I love photos and tutorials.

    I guess I do have a question for anyone out there in regards to insulation. I wasn’t sure if anyone had a preference for using the Thermolam or Thinsulate. I know the Termolam is more readily available but the price isn’t that different between the two. I live in Northeast Iowa where we get some pretty interesting winters, it’s not unusual for it to stay in the single digits for a long period of time and dip to -30 degrees. I would like the coat to be warm enough for mucking around in the snow, but not have her look like a marshmallow. Sandi, your coat looked like a nice thickness. I’m not sure of what your weather is like.

    Anyone have any thoughts? Thanks! 🙂

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    Liesl Gibson
    Keymaster
    @liesl

    I can’t speak to the difference (if there is any) between the two brands, but I CAN tell you that the Thinsulate is available in different thicknesses. I used a rather thick one for S’s coat last winter, and it was absolutely warm enough for very cold Winters (I’m from Wisconsin, so I know cold!) without being too bulky. She didn’t complain once about being cold all winter long. Wishing I had one like it, too!

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    Rpankow @excytin

    Thanks for your imput Liesl! S looked very cozy in her coat, yet mobile judging by your photos. I just have visions of “A Christmas Story”, where Randy couldn’t put his arms down and “looked like a tick that was about to pop”. Which thickness did you use if you can recall? Thanks again!

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    Todd Gibson
    Keymaster
    @todd

    Here’s the link:

    http://www.voguefabricsstore.com/store/product.php?productid=865&cat=0&page=1

    It doesn’t say what thickness, but I’m sure if you called they could tell you.

    -Liesl (logged in as Todd)

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    sahmcolorado @sahmcolorado

    I’m guessing that the Thinsulate would be warmer and higher quality than the Thermolam. The Thermolam is really just a thin, dense poly batting with a protective scrim on both sides. It looks and feels like the thin fusible batting used in placemats and similar crafts. I’ve got a couple of used ski jacket type coats for the kids to wear for playing in the snow. I am making the School Days coats for day to day running around to school and shops where they won’t be outside for too long at a time – mostly in and out of the car. We end up using the lighter weight coats here most days. It gets cold, but nothing like New England (where I grew up) since it’s almost always sunny here (northern Colorado).

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    sahmcolorado @sahmcolorado

    BTW – very funny reference to the Christmas Story movie – I remember feeling like that when I went out to play in the snow as a kid!

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    Rpankow @excytin

    Thanks ladies for all the information. You both have helped me decide on what I’m going to go with, which is the thinsulate. The way I figure it, if I’m going to put in the work, time and expense of making my daughter’s coat, by golly she’s going to wear it. 🙂 I know I can get good coats for a lot less than making them, but I want to do this for me and for her. It’s such a charge when people say, “you MADE that?”.

    Liesl, it’s nice that you have “field tested” the coat. I think people often forget how natural fibers can still fit the bill in today’s world of synthetic performance fabrics, including myself.

    Sandi, I think we’ve all had those moments as a kid! 🙂

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    Rpankow @excytin

    One more quick question, well, make it two. Which side of the thinsulate faces the outer fabric. Do you have the fluffly side up, with the smooth side facing the wool, or visa versa. Also Liesl, did you use the vest inside of S’s coat to help with more warmth? Thanks again!! 🙂

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    ccnigro @ccnigro

    jumping back in here : it doesn’t matter which way the thinsulate faces. The properties lie in it’s “existance” – it’s not like using a vapor barrier that requires one side or the other. I wouldn’t bother with the additional vest. Using a good wool, lining and thinsulate should provide tons of warmth. I like the regular coat lining for use- it’s made for coats and provides better warmth on it’s own.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/thepurplepineapple/4090621486/

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