Oliver + S

Final topstitching step

Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)
  • LINK
    Toyota888 @Toyota888

    Because I am a new sewer I am very law abiding and follow instructions to the letter even if they seem a bit odd – but after topstitching the entire length of the jacket’s hem with all of the jacket fabric under the arm of the sewing machine (kind of rolled up as tight as I could) I realised that maybe I should have started on the opposite side from the one shown in the picture in the pattern. As I have 2 more of these to make soon – is there any reason you would start on the side indicated in the pattern rather than the opposite one?

    LINK
    Liesl Gibson
    Keymaster
    @liesl

    I love that you refer to yourself as “law abiding” when it comes to sewing. Thanks for the chuckle!

    Do you mean that the edge of the coat was on the wrong side of your presser foot when you followed the arrows? I agree that it would be easier to stitch starting from the opposite side of the coat because the coat itself wouldn’t get in the way, either. Sorry–wasn’t thinking about that when I made that illustration. So by all means, switch it and sew in the other direction, starting from the opposite side of the coat. Thanks for pointing that out!

    And the coat, by the way, looks fantastic! That’s a lot of warm fabric for the hot weather you’re having!

    LINK
    Toyota888 @Toyota888

    Yes – that’s right – I was thinking the whole time that I probably could do it from the other side. But then I have done other patterns of yours where I can’t possibly understand why I am doing the strange things stated in the instructions and voila – a perfect dress comes out! So I’m sticking with blind faith for now 🙂

    I am very pleased with it – at the moment my 3.5 y/o has become sick of putting it on for every guest who enters the house so now I am using the 5.5 y/o who is very lanky and it sort of fits with nothing on underneath in an ape-in-a-suit kind of way.

    I keep meaning to ask you about your walking foot revelation – now that I have used one I really wonder why machines aren’t just made that way – I guess they don’t do zigzag but is there anything else you should definitely NOT do with them?

    LINK
    Liesl Gibson
    Keymaster
    @liesl

    Sorry about that! I’m glad it worked out, but definitely switch it when you do the other coats.

    Ah yes. I love the walking foot and leave mine on for most sewing. I’ve gotten some strange looks from other seamstresses when I tell them this, but what’s not to love about it? I’d rather have an even feed on almost anything I make. You wouldn’t want it if you want to use the presser foot to your advantage (like if you’re easing a longer piece onto a shorter piece and want the presser foot to help push the shorter piece along), but otherwise I see no reason not to use it most of the time. Aside from the fact that it’s a little louder than stitching with a regular foot…

    LINK
    Lizabeth @Lizabeth

    Toyotoa888, there is a machine made with a ‘permanent’ walking foot–some pfaff sewing machines feature the “IDT” system which is a little walking foot on the foot ankle which you can engage or disengage depending on your project. I do not have a pfaff, but have sewn on one in classes, and do enjoy it.

    LINK
    Toyota888 @Toyota888

    Lizabeth that sounds very handy – getting that big foot on and off when you need to zigzag any seams is rather a bother.

    Liesl – The noise is rather fearsome – although it does add a strangely satisfying atmosphere of working with heavy duty machinery!

    By the way – today a friend came over who sews and was asking about recent projects, I was loath to drag out the red coat as I was a bit worried the little man was getting a bit sick of having the thing paraded around (4 year old tempraments being what they are). After I had brought out a frock (the jump rope) he eagerly volunteered that “I have an idea – you should show her the red jacket”.

Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

copyright

Unless otherwise credited, all work on this blog is © Liesl + Co., Inc, 2008-2017. You are welcome to link to this blog, but please ask permission before using any text or images.