Oliver + S

Do you find that the patterns run small?

Viewing 7 posts - 16 through 22 (of 22 total)
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    Alison Cummins @Alison Cummins

    How do you read the size measurements?

    For instance, the chest measurement for 2T is 20″. Does that mean:

    > The child will be able to wear the garment comfortably once their chest measurement reaches is 20″? (That is, the garment fits 20″–21”)

    > The garment fits best when the child’s chest measurement us is exactly 20”? (That is, the garment fits 19½”–20½”)

    > The child will grow out of the garment when their chest measurement reaches 20″? (That is, the garment fits 19″–20”)

    I feel a bit weird asking this question about such small measurements, but I’m making something for a child who isn’t exactly on the measurements and I need it to fit now, for a particular event.

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    Tamara @justsewit

    I checked the measurements against the growth charts I have in my children’s health books (the ones that keep records of checkups with the health nurse) and from what I can see the measurements cover up to those on the 75th percentile. So saying this, if the measurement is saying 20″ for the chest then it will be for those measuring up to that number. If the child can fit into the size below then use this size and adjust according to length if they are taller etc. but if they fall outside the smaller size measurement then do this particular size and you will find that it will fit and not look like it is falling off.

    It is always best to go up to the next size if the child’s measurments are larger than what it states on the chart. That way you still retain the amount of ease that is worked into the pattern that effects the design.

    What pattern are you using and what is the child’s chest measurement?

    Hope this helps.

    Tamara

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    Alison Cummins @Alison Cummins

    Thanks, Tamara!

    I’m making Bedtime Story kimonos (as blouses) and Class Picnic tops (lengthened into dresses by adding a ruffle) for a three-year-old with a 20″ chest measurement and a four-year-old with a 21″ chest measurement.

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    mkhs @mkhs

    I can’t speak to the kimono, as I’ve never made it, but I’ve made a lot of Class Picnic tops and nightgowns for a tall and skinny preschooler. The elastic at the neckline guarantees that it won’t fall off the shoulders, so I never bother to size down and lengthen this pattern, as I usually do. It’s a very forgiving fit. I like to make it with an A-line skirt when I do it as a dress.

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    Alison Cummins @Alison Cummins

    Thanks, mkhs! I want to make this version: https://flic.kr/p/dxX5BB

    I guess I’ll make the 18–24 mo (20½” chest) for the 3 year old with the 20″ chest and the 2T (21″ chest) for the four year old with the 21″ chest then. It just feels so odd to be making such small sizes for them.

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    mkhs @mkhs

    I just measured my sleeping girl’s chest, and she’s also 21″ and 4yo. At the moment, her picnic blouses are all unaltered 3Ts and look great.

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    juliamom2009 @juliamom2009

    Hi Alison – the dress you are referring to is my version (and thanks for liking it!) – my daughter is 4 1/2 now, and the dress is still in her closet. Her chest measures 21.5″, and it still fits her no problem. The dress is a size 4, but now is way too short. It might do with leggings this upcoming winter.

    If I were you, I’d think about making the tops a in a bit bigger size to give them some room to grow – maybe a size 2T for the 3 year old, and a 3T for the 4 year old. Just my two cents!

Viewing 7 posts - 16 through 22 (of 22 total)

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