Oliver + S

Creating template from toile

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    Profile photo of LindaLinda @Knitting1

    Hello ladies, hoping those of you who sew for yourself and do fitting can help me. I have now got a toile that I am happy with that fits me (learnt a lot about adjustments). I now want to copy it onto firm paper/card to use as a template so I can compare it to tissue patterns when I sew for myself so the clothes will hopefully fit me. However, I never noted the alterations I made or marked them on the tissue pattern that I made the toile from and anyway the tissue is now in a right state! I therefore took the toile apart again, ironed it and have drawn around the skirt pieces to make a template (Sloper? Block?). But I suddenly realised that the bodice front is very 3D so can’t be traced flat and then wondered if I should unpick all the darts on all my toile pieces and draw around them to make the template? But if I do this I don’t see how I will be able to place it on top of a new tissue pattern to compare sizes/shapes as it will be too big with darts unpicked, won’t it? Also, do I make the template with or without the seam allowances included? I have Fit for Real People and have scoured the internet until I’m sick of it, and I still can’t make sense of what to do next. Help!!!!!!

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    Profile photo of ViolaisabelleViolaisabelle @Violaisabelle

    Hi Linda,

    It’s a holiday here, today, so this will be quick and hopefully it gives you some idea. Perhaps someone else can give information as well. I’ll try to get back to this, either tonight or tomorrow. Here’s the short answer. 😉

    -I would unpick your muslin and press carefully (do not iron back and forth as you may stretch your muslin)

    -If this is a ‘fitted garment’ with no ease, consider it a block/sloper (not sure of the terminology where you are)

    -If this has ease built into the pattern, I would consider it a template.

    -It’s up to you how you use your template/muslin regarding seam allowances. Whatever you choose, mark it on the muslin AND the template, so it’s clear to you when you come back to it. 🙂

    -If your brain wants a 3D model of the garment, after you have unpicked it to trace it, you can sew it back up to save and use for comparison. You can compare the flat, traced off pattern, but brains work differently and it all depends on how you interpret things. Having a sewn up muslin and a flat pattern are both viable options, but flat pattern/template is needed if you want to compare flat pattern to flat pattern (if I understand your question correctly).

    -In the industry, you would likely not have the seam allowances on your block, but you CAN do it for your personal use. 🙂 Do what works best for you. 🙂

    -I have gotten in the habit (most times) to make notations on a piece of paper and put with the muslin and pattern so I know what changes I made. That way, if I make it again, that pattern, for someone else, I can compare what I did to what I need to do. I kick myself afterwards because of the times I have ‘skipped’ this step. 😛

    Glad to hear you are happy with your muslin, that’s wonderful!!!!!

    Carol

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    Profile photo of LindaLinda @Knitting1

    That is very kind of you to reply when its a holiday where you are (Australia, US???) I will read your reply over again carefully- I am itching to make something! Thank you.

    LINK
    Profile photo of LindaLinda @Knitting1

    Yes, that’s correct, I want to be able to compare ‘my’ flat pattern to a new flat pattern. I am kicking myself, believe me, that I wasn’t keeping notes- especially when I had read that I should- and then promptly forgot about it!

    LINK
    Profile photo of ViolaisabelleViolaisabelle @Violaisabelle

    It’s Canadian Thanksgiving! 🙂 Don’t you have a daughter over here? Or, have I mixed that up? 😉 I’m out west. Tomorrow is the official holiday, but many of us celebrate it on the Sunday. Celebrations at my house…cooking up a storm right now. 🙂

    Carol

    LINK
    Profile photo of LindaLinda @Knitting1

    Yes, my oldest girl lives in Cape Breton. Didn’t realise it was Thanksgiving- hope you’ve got lovely things to eat. I love cooking too!

    LINK
    Profile photo of ViolaisabelleViolaisabelle @Violaisabelle

    We had wonderful food to eat with lots of Thanksgiving for everything! We are blessed!

    I’m not sure how technical you want to get on this project. I thought I would give you a couple of links for reading, if that helps clarify things for you. Before listing those, I just wanted to say, once again, do what works for you! 🙂 It’s best to compare flat pattern to flat pattern, but having a 3D model or muslin stitched up could be very helpful for you as well. As you move forward from this project, and work on other patterns for yourself, you will start to see a ‘pattern’ of adjustments that you make, regularly, to get the fit you need/want. Take note of that, write it down, and soon, you will automatically start adjusting your patterns with those changes. 🙂

    With respect to seam allowances or not, again, I say, do what works best for you! I just went through a series of exercises, taking away seam allowances, then adding it back in and it was a brain exercise! 😛

    I think this is a matter of doing it several times over, then it becomes more clear. 🙂 Have fun and keep practicing, you will be thrilled that you do!

    Here are a couple of links from an ‘industry’ perspective. However, please keep in mind, even those from the industry use the words differently! I have smiled in my classes as I hear experts use these words interchangeably. 🙂 If you are not working in the industry, then don’t worry about it. 🙂

    http://www.fashion-incubator.com/archive/what_is_a_sloper/

    http://www.fashion-incubator.com/archive/what_is_a_block/

    Happy Sewing and Fitting! 🙂

    Carol

    LINK
    Profile photo of LindaLinda @Knitting1

    Thanks for the links, Carol. Very interesting info on there. I’ve re drawn my flat patterns now to include darts (open) and seam allowances. I just need some time now to start sewing! All in all, I’m glad it has taken me so long to get to this stage because I have learnt so much along the way. My mistakes have meant that I’ve had to find out more info as well. My next step will be comparing ‘my’ pattern pieces with the garment pattern pieces that I decide to make. Looking forward to it. Thanks for your helpful responses.

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