Oliver + S

Changing the length of the Playdate dress

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    jodier @jodier

    Hi Liesl – I saw the shortened dress on your blog and wondered how to do it. I have only sewn a few adult baggy shorts from a Butterick pattern before so I am a bit of a newbie. I am about to embark on one of your other dress patterns and wanted to make it longer. But there are no markings on the pattern (worried face). The Butterick pattern I used before had a line a bit up from the hem telling me to lengthen/shorten here. Do I just add on/take away from the hem on your patterns? Thanks jodie.

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    Liesl Gibson
    Keymaster
    @liesl

    I apologize for the delay in replying to your post. The truth is, I need to do a full blog post about this and haven’t had a chance yet. To answer your question quickly, I simply trimmed 4″ from the bottom of the pattern piece for this particular pattern, since I didn’t want the tunic to flare as much as the dress and didn’t want to shorten in the middle the way patterns are often shortened and lengthened. However, in general I would recommend drawing a line perpendicular to the grain line and using that line to splice in more (or less) length, and then blend the edges of the pattern piece to complete the revision. The placement of the line depends on the pattern: for a pant leg or a skirt, you would probably position the line about halfway up the pattern piece. For a dress, I would suggest halfway between the hem and the armhole. We don’t put a line on the patterns because I fear it would clutter the pattern pieces and make them confusing (especially since each size would need its own line in many cases). But I promise to expound on this some day (hopefully soon), with photos to demonstrate.

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    jodier @jodier

    Hi Liesl. Thanks for the info and I will give it a go. I figured you were rather busy from your blogs 🙂 Amy seems to have the wrong dimensions! Thanks Jodie.

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