Oliver + S

Alterations: How to lower front waistband (& keep back high), w/o changing hem grain line?

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    Profile photo of rebeccarebecca @rebecca

    I am trying to sew pants/skirts for my daughter, who prefers a “low-rider” style in front, so it pushes beneath her buddha belly (short-rise in front), but still needs to be higher in back.

    I understand flat-pattern alterations, but cannot figure this out immediately. I can’t simply cut off part of the hem in front, as it would change the grain line, and I want it to be even horizontally, of course.

    So, on pants/skirts that have a simple fold-over waistband (lazy days skirt), how do I lower that front, and still allow for a smooth fold-over (while needing it 2″ lower in front), without taking it off the hem?

    And in the case of pants, such as the Sailboat pants, that have a tailored front, same question?

    I hope this makes sense… to make it easier, I’m attaching an image of what I’m trying to do (lower front waist): third image.

    Attachments:
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    Profile photo of SarviSarvi @Sarvi

    That is exactly how I want *my* pants to fit, (breathing room in front, plumber’s coverage in back) so although I regrettably don’t have a solution, I eagerly await the advice of others.

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    Profile photo of NicoleNicole @motherof5

    How old is your daughter, by your description I am assuming a toddler? So she may only wear the garment for a short time?

    If it was me, I would be researching which patterns are the best fit for that body shape, rather then altering a higher waisted pattern.

    The After School pants are a brilliant fit, for example, maybe others could chime in?
    AfterSchool Pants-No Frills

    AfterSchool Top&Pants

    Another suggestion is to leave the waistband off and add a tube of ribbing, like maternity trousers or yoga pants.

    I am sorry not to be more help with the actual alteration, I lack skills in that area. 🙂

    • This reply was modified 1 year ago by Profile photo of Nicole Nicole. Reason: to add photolinks
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    Profile photo of rebeccarebecca @rebecca

    She is 5, and her legs haven’t changed length in nearly 2 years. She’s extremely petite. So, I do need to figure this out, and sew clothing to last!

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    Profile photo of NicoleNicole @motherof5

    Good luck, I hope you come back and share what you learn.

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    Profile photo of SarviSarvi @Sarvi

    I wonder if this would be a good candidate for fitting on her body with muslin, then working back from that to a paper pattern that could be your master pattern.

    So you’d make the back half of a pair of pants as usual, and sew them to the front half just bit above the crotch. Then fold down the front half at the waist into the shape you want and mark that line. Then unpick the front halves and add back in seam allowances.

    You’d be making a slightly curved front waistband, a bit like how a hem facing is curved. So instead of a single rectangle that’s folded in half, you have two thinner arcs that are sewn together first, then applied like a regular waistband. You’d make the curve match the waist edge of the front of the pants.

    What do you think, folks, might something like that work?

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    Profile photo of rebeccarebecca @rebecca

    @Nicole — the pictures don’t come through via email, so I didn’t see them until now! I do see that the waistband is nicely low in the front; perhaps that will be a good pair!

    I DID find the alteration, though: http://cationdesigns.blogspot.com/2013/09/pants-pattern-alterations.html (Image #4)

    In the case of tailored front pants (Sailboat pants, etc), this should work fine, if I apply to all front pieces. Er, I hope so…

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    Profile photo of Lightning McStitchLightning McStitch @LightningMcStitch

    I second the After School as definitely worth a go. The back yoke on those is fabulous for giving sufficiently high back coverage. So much so that I’ve used the back half of those mashed to other pants fronts.
    I imagine if you use a yoke, like Nature Walk, you can shape that how you like, then add a straight hemmed skirt underneath.

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    Profile photo of SarviSarvi @Sarvi

    Haha, that link is great!

    “There’s nothing quite so nerve-wracking as knowing that somebody is seam-ripping right by your butt.”

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    Profile photo of needlewomanneedlewoman @needlewoman

    Thank you for extra info/comments about this pattern. Hopefully will get opp to try this pattern this year. So interesting to see how much Tildy has grown, Nicole since the photo of her in coral pants/top c/o After School.

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    Profile photo of KerrilynKerrilyn @Kerrilyn

    On the Peek A Boo Skinny Jeans (not an O+S pattern) the front is lower rise. They achieved this by curving the top of the front piece from the side seam to the centre front. Obviously this would not work for a fold over waistband but did work for the two pairs of jeans I made with attached waistbands. Good rear coverage and no bunching at the front from the waistband sitting under the tummy. I actually lifted the front a little on the second pair as we didn’t need it that low.

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    Profile photo of cybele727cybele727 @cybele727

    Rebecca,
    My daughter has the same needs. Buddha belly and higher rise in the back.

    We love the afterschool pants for this reason. You choose the size based on the fit of the front, lower rise. Then on the back you do a small alteration that adds to the back rise.

    Nicole, I think in your flickr account you drew a picture of the alteration for me. We need to find that thread for her with that picture!

    This works beautifully! This slight alteration, I add about an inch in back rise length.

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    Profile photo of NicoleNicole @motherof5

    I am searching jenny

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    Profile photo of rebeccarebecca @rebecca

    Awesome. I did just do a full measurement, and she’s a solid 2″ lower in the front. Her front rise is only 6″, and her back rise is 8″.

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