Oliver + S

Made a boo boo – What to do?

Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)
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    phyllis_stein @phyllis_stein

    I’m working on the bodice just sewing the front and back pieces together and I discovered that back in step 1 where you sew 3/8 inch around the neck I actually sewing 3/4 inch (yeah, I’m a metric gal).

    What should I do?

    Take everything apart and start all over again or just rip those stitches out and continue?

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    Violaisabelle @Violaisabelle

    I am assuming you are talking about the staystitching, is that correct? I would simply go back and unpick this and put it at the 3/8″ line. Follow the directional arrows that Liesl puts in the instructions for this step. This will help prevent the neckline from being stretched out. You want this stitching inside the seam allowance. It will take just a little time to pull it out, no big deal. I hope you will share pictures of your dress when you are finished. I think this is a beautifully designed jumper.

    Carol

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    phyllis_stein @phyllis_stein

    Yes, staystiching. Thank you violaisabelle. I’ll attack it tomorrow.

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    losabia @losabia

    I agree with Carol, but I’d even put the new staystitch in *before* ripping out the original, wayward stitching if that’s possible? I imagine that the neckline would be more stable after being reinforced with the new line of stitching and wouldn’t become distorted as you did your unpicking 🙂

    Lisa K.

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    Violaisabelle @Violaisabelle

    Lisa’s suggestion is correct, I should have stated that. I would suggest that when you are unpicking the first line of staystitching, you keep the seamripper facing away from the second row of stitching so that there is no chance of you accidentally stabbing the new stitching line. 🙂

    Carol

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    phyllis_stein @phyllis_stein

    Thanks Lisa and Carol 🙂

Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)

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