Oliver + S

How much fabric do I need to sew contrasting elements?

Viewing 5 posts - 1 through 5 (of 5 total)
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    Kim @kmac0107

    I saw the dress on Flicker with the contrasting fabric on the collar, pocket trims and sash. What is the required yardage for dress and the contrasting fabric? Currently it is a total of 1 and 3/4 yards for the dress in a size 2.

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    Liesl Gibson
    Keymaster
    @liesl

    Hi there. We didn’t calculate yardage for that particular option, but you should be able to determine it yourself by cutting out the necessary pattern pieces and doing a “mock” layout on a piece of folded fabric before you purchase the necessary fabric.

    There are so many ways to customize a pattern by mixing fabrics in different parts of the garment. It’s not difficult to do once you have the pattern. Have fun with it!

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    sayiamyou @maraya

    I just cut out View B and really could have gotten away, I think, with a 1/4 yard or less for the contrast. Contrast being: pocket bias (2) and placket pieces. I would go 1/4 just in case you have a slip of the scissors.

    For View A, I think you’d be safe with a 1/2 yard (just eye-balling the sash piece)? Depending on the sleeve version though, you might want to go ahead with 1 1/2 yd of your main fabric to be on the safe side.

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    Kim @kmac0107

    Thank you for your help. Two weeks ago I laid out the pieces including the sash, like Liesl suggested above, on a piece of fabric (honestly that make so much sense, I feel stupid for not figuring that out). I discovered for a size 2 I need 37 1/2″ for the main color and 25″ for the contrasting, because of the length and direction of the sash.

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    sahmcolorado @sahmcolorado

    Just make sure to account for shrinkage of the fabric when you prewash it. If you assume 6% shrinkage or just round up and buy an extra 1/4 yd, you’ll be fine.

Viewing 5 posts - 1 through 5 (of 5 total)

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