Oliver + S

tailor's chalk, white

tailor's chalk, white
Price: $3.00
Item: OLV-LCS00014
Average Rating:

Tailor's chalk is sure to become your most-used marking tool. This professional-grade marking chalk makes a nice, clear line and rubs or washes out easily. Choose between white and yellow, depending on the color of fabric you are using.

 

tailor's chalk, white
  • Using Tailor's Chalk

    Tailor's chalk is a more compressed than sidewalk chalk, so it doesn't crumble quite as easily. It works best on darker colors. Tailor's chalk makes a nice, clear line that rubs or washes out when you're finished with it, so you don't need to worry about leaving a permanent line on your fabric.

    Tailor's chalk is great for transferring markings from a pattern, for marking lines on your fabric, and even for tracing around a pattern piece if you'd like to trace before you cut (so you can remove your pattern piece instead of cutting with the pattern piece pinned to the fabric).

    Sharpening Tailor's Chalk

    You can sharpen the edge of tailor's chalk by scraping it with a sharp knife or blade. I use an X-ACTO blade and hold the piece of chalk over the garbage while I scrape it.

     

  • Average rating: (5 of 5) based on 1 reviews

    Good Sturdy Tool
    Reviewed by on 01/10/2014
    I love tailors chalk and while I do use a re-fill pen as well, that can be fragile for working with larger areas. This is a good sturdy 'chunk' of chalk you can get hold off. I particularly like it for marking bias. The 'dimple' in the middle gives you a good grip. It brushes off nicely too. A very economical size piece.
    1 of 1 customers found this helpful.
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  • Tailor's chalk is probably my most-used marking tool. I have a few other marking tools I like to use, but tailor's chalk is the one I use most frequently. Tailor's chalk is more compressed than sidewalk or chalkboard chalk, so it doesn't crumble quite as easily and makes a sharper line. I think it would be accurate to say that tailor's chalk is more silky than sidewalk chalk, if that makes any sense.

    tailors-chalk

    As a marking tool, chalk works best on darker colors (although the yellow is actually really good at marking pretty much any color except yellow) and makes a very visible line on the fabric. It rubs or washes out when you're finished with it, so you don't need to worry about the marks becoming permanent. It's great for transferring markings from a pattern, for marking stitching lines on your fabric, and even for tracing around a pattern piece before you cut. (Once you’ve traced the pattern piece you can remove it from the fabric and cut on the chalked lines, which makes for really accurate cutting if you like to work that way.)

    And here's a little trick I learned from my tailoring professor many years ago: you can sharpen the edge of your chalk by scraping it with a sharp knife or blade. I use my X-ACTO blade and hold it over the garbage while I gently scrape it away from me at a 45-degree(ish) angle, and this gives it a really nice, sharp edge that draws a fine, crisp line. So you can keep using the same piece of chalk for quite a while, even when it's just a little piece.

    chalk-sharpening