Oliver + S

lisette for butterick B6295 sewing pattern

lisette for butterick B6295 sewing pattern
Price: $12.50
Brand: Lisette
Item: OLV-B6295
Average Rating:

Active wear set includes a partially-lined athletic bra (or yoga top), a tank with built-in shelf bra, and leggings in two lengths. Each top can be made with two different shoulder strap options. Leggings can be sewn full-length or cropped. Both leggings views include a side panel with pocket detail as well as a flattering back yoke seam. The full-length leggings also include a ruching detail at the side panels and a mock-coverstitch finish which can be achieved with a serger or with a simple machine zigzag stitch. This pattern is designed for two-way stretch fabrics (meaning that the fabric stretches from side-to-side as well as up-and-down).

 

lisette for butterick B6295 sewing pattern

  • Butterick B6295

     

  • English System
    Pattern
    Size
    Bust
    (in.)
    Waist
    (in.)
    Hip
    (in.)
    6 30 ½ 23 32 ½
    8 31 ½ 24 33 ½
    10 32 ½ 25 34 ½
    12 34 26 ½ 36
    14 36 28 38
    16 38 30 40
    18 40 32 42
    20 42 34 44
    22 44 37 46

     

    Metric System
    Pattern
    Size
    Bust
    (cm)
    Waist
    (cm)
    Hip
    (cm)
    6 77 58 83
    8 80 61 85
    10 83 64 88
    12 87 67 92
    14 92 71 97
    16 97 76 102
    18 102 81 107
    20 107 87 112
    22 112 94 117

     

  • Average rating: (1 of 5) based on 1 reviews

    Not the quality I'm used to from Liesl/Lisette patterns
    Reviewed by on 07/21/2016
    Workout clothes are expensive, so I was thrilled when this pattern was published. I've made Jalie and Seamwork workout patterns before, but their offerings aren't yoga focused. I thrilled excited to see a yoga top that included its own shelf bra! I bought some dri fit power mesh and some nifty tactel and felt all set to go! Then....I read the pattern. Look, I know it's old fashioned to read the complete set of directions before cutting, but it's how I was taught. Frankly, I'm glad I did. It saved me a lot of money. My first worry was the odd layout instructions--for the bra top, you don't cut on a fold, you flip the pieces over, even though that often causes less accuracy. My second worry was the instruction to, and I quote, "Stretch fabric evenly in front and back of needle while stitching using a straight or zigzag stitch." Are you kidding me?!? A STRAIGHT stitch for workout wear?? Most knit tee shirts break plain straight stitches, never mind negative ease sports bras. Years ago, when I was young and dumb, I used a straight stitch on a pair of knit pj pants. It's so much fun when you sit down and hear that pop pop pop of stitches breaking. That'd be fun to experience in yoga class, with my bra top, right? I have, on occasion, used fancy knit stitches that mimic the look of straight stitches, but that was clearly not the intent. Nor was there any guidance provided on zig zag stitches. Contrast to Cloth Habit's Watson bra instructions, where she discusses the use of zig zag in bras and offers guidance and recommended stitch length and widths. Many of the instructions are confusing or needlessly complicated. Turning the straps inside out is going to be impossible without one of those fancy turning gadgets. Why not instead use a FOE finish? The instruction on #15 didn't seem to match the illustration, and I puzzled over it for a long time before giving up. Finally, despite having made my own sports bras, I did not know what a 'bra insert' was. They are called for in the pattern, but they're only mentioned at the end. "When wearing, slip purchased bra inserts through front side openings." I guess they're those fake cups, but no guidance was given on choosing an appropriate size, whether they're optional, or what to do if they slide around. I've worn padded sports bras, but never ones with Victoria-Secret-like fake cups. I'd have appreciated some sort of guidance before splashing out money on a non-returnable item. But the worst part of this pattern is the leggings. Look, leggings aren't hard to make, and I feel like an idiot for coming out and saying 'I can't make these.' But.... I can't make these. The instructions are frustrating. For instance, "Finish side eges of front using a serger and an overcast stitch, trimming away the 5/8th" (1.5 cm) seam allowance. OR Zig zag:" There's a very detailed illustration of the exact serger stitch AND the trimming, but the zig zag stitch is a generic picture of a zig zag on the very edge of some random seam. Should we trim the seam allowance and then zig-zag, the way one does to finish a woven seam? Sew the zig zag, then trim closely? Based on the illustration, it sure looks like you're supposed to sew the zig zag at the edge, then leave the seam allowance, but that would leave extra fabric! Worse, a zig zag stitch on the very edge of fabric isn't very stable. It's fine as a finish, but ON ITS OWN it's not sturdy enough for exercise wear. The instructions for the back, number 13, read: "FINISH side edges of back, using a serger and an overcast stitch, trimming away the 5/8th " (1.5 cm) seam allowance." There's a very clear, reassuringly Liesl illustration that demonstrates exactly what the finished seam should like. Great, right? Except I don't own a serger! (And nope, no alternatives are given.) I feel bad for writing this review, but at the same time.... I don't want anyone else to experience the same frustration I did. Not only am
    I'm so sorry you were disappointed. Let me see if I can help clear up some of the issues. Knits are tricky to write instructions for, in part because there are so many types of machines you can use to sew them and in part because there are so many ways to sew the knits and preferences for which is the best way. We tried to cover as many of the options as possible with this pattern, and one of those options in the old Stretch-n-Sew method of stretching while you sew a straight stitch. Because you're stretching the fabric as you stitch it, the stitches won't pop, so the method is safe and does work. It's just not seen very often these days because we have so many other options now. The bra inserts are listed on the back of the pattern envelope with the other notions and trims. They're sort of a standard swim/sports bra thing that can be found at most notions stores. They're intended for a little extra coverage. Regarding the leggings, I wanted to avoid serged seam allowances inside the leggings to eliminate the possibility of chafing, so we wrote the pattern to put the seam allowances on the outside, with coverstitch or mock coverstitch to finish them. The idea is that you sew the fabrics with wrong sides together and then trim the seam allowances (preferably with a serger stitch to finish the seam allowances, but a zig zag stitch also works) and stitch it down so it's kept away from the skin. I've also sewn this pattern the "normal" way with finished seam allowances on the inside, but we wanted it to be a pattern that's appropriate as athletic clothing, which is why the construction is a little different than normal. I hope that helps! The Lisette patterns are generally written with a little less detail than our Liesl + Co instructions since the audience for Lisette is more accustomed to Butterick/McCall/Vogue instructions already. Cheers, Liesl
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