Oliver + S

Sarvi

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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 1,915 total)
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    Sarvi @Sarvi

    I’m going to go off course here and say that you should check Yelp and ask around in your local sewing community to see who the most reputable dealer/repair shop is, and look at the brand they sell. If anything goes hinky or you just need service done, you don’t want to have to ship your machine. Also a local dealer will often include a few free lessons/machine orientation to help you learn all the features. Bernina, Janome, Viking all make solid machines and you will notice that people generally like what they have. If you can test drive a few different models in person you might find you like the ergonomics/settings of one a bit more than another.

    While in the shop, I would test-sew (on my own fabric swatches from home that represent the types of fabric I will be using):

    straight
    zig zag
    reverse
    buttonhole
    edgestitch

    and play around to see how easy/intuitive it is to thread, change bobbin, needle up/down, change tension, change stitch length/width, swap feet (including walking foot).

    For me that’s 95% of sewing jobs. A walking foot can be costly but I think is necessary, so I’d bear that in mind. I bought the cheapest expensive machine (Viking, about $550 at the time, 10-15 years ago, with a walking foot, $150 — but I am pretty certain I’d have been just as happy with any brand) available locally and have not yet felt the need for an upgrade. I’m sure a fancier machine would be even better (I’d love to have a feature where I can program a buttonhole — I get one just right and hit save, and the machine makes the next buttonholes the same way as the saved one) and I’d love a machine that can handle leather/super thick & tough fabrics a bit better, but I don’t do enough of that kind of sewing to justify the extra cost.

    • This reply was modified 7 years ago by Sarvi.
    LINK
    Sarvi @Sarvi

    I find that I can’t be firing on all pistons at once. If I’m sewing a lot, I’m not knitting. If I’m knitting a lot, I’m not cooking, and so on. I too have been in a non-sewing phase for what feels like a long time. I have had half a Music Blouse on a hanger by my sewing desk for 6 months, no exaggeration. It may well not fit by the time I finish it. One thing that does help is Liesl’s suggestion of ending by setting up the next step. That does get me into “just another bite” mode and that’ll keep me going.

    Another thing that sometimes works is watching videos of new techniques, that I then really want to go try. Have you seen the blog where the costume designer for Game of Thrones talks about how she makes some of the textured fabrics for the different characters? SO MUCH thought goes into it, it’s fascinating.

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    Sarvi @Sarvi

    That’s a great idea! I do seem to always have a few extra blocks lying around and don’t know what to do with them, even though I’m not a big quilter. And after my daughter’s recent birthday, I felt just awful about the enormous pile of gift wrap we recycled. A nice reusable gift bag is much better!

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    Sarvi @Sarvi

    Sorry I didn’t get back here sooner — but I like that latest pic a lot, the fit looks great!

    LINK
    Sarvi @Sarvi

    I’m also trying to follow what’s happening, and I think the bit that’s throwing me is the bit where doing the FBA changed the size of the sleeve opening — it shouldn’t, I don’t think? Am I misremembering? I made this in both a 10 and an 8, with and without an FBA — I found in the end that although I do a 3/4″ FBA for the Cinema Dress, I liked the fit of the Maritime better without any FBA at all — because the cut of the top is inherently less fitted, and the style ease + the give of the jersey fabric is all I needed to be comfortable.

    Have a peep at the tops done in striped fabric especially and you can see how far down the shoulder the sleeve/body seam hits — it’s more \ than | — and that is by design. I think that if you would prefer that seam to be more vertical, you’re going to find you’re fighting the pattern, and that’ll be frustrating. Can you perhaps post an inspiration pic of a shirt with a shoulder/sleeve seam you want to achieve, and we can suggest a better starting point?

    [And this last is way off topic but I also have narrow shoulders (and mine are sloping too) and I have found that a raglan sleeve is often nicer on me. That’s going in the opposite direction of the drop-shoulder, though!]

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    Sarvi @Sarvi

    https://www.fabric.com/buy/0363761/kaufman-bi-stretch-crepe-navy

    Looks like they have a bit left if you need some.

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    Sarvi @Sarvi

    Great! It’s a fun place to shop, enjoy your goodies 🙂

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    Sarvi @Sarvi

    Oh, and Michael Levine is in my neck of the woods. I’ll have a peek next time I’m there.

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    Sarvi @Sarvi

    @mama_knowles I look forward to seeing what you make and how you construct it.


    @gailanncreates
    that’s a fantastic idea, I’m going to try it out, thank you!

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    Sarvi @Sarvi

    Cute project! Stay cool and fresh, I’m sure she’ll be very happy in her new dress.

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    Sarvi @Sarvi

    I could’ve sworn I’ve seen this, perhaps not for the Everyday Skirt, but I can’t recall where. If I remember, I’ll pop up a link for you. How about using this:

    felt bows: a free pattern and tutorial

    I think if you wanted it to be from fabric, you could add a seam allowance (maybe 1/4″) cut two and interface one, stitch and turn. Then just stitch to the waistband. I’m sure there are other ways of doing it too. Or you could make a felt one and stitch a snap to the back, so you could remove it for washing the skirt.

    Post a photo if you make it!

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    Sarvi @Sarvi

    Oh and last one:

    http://www.lacma.org/ReigningMen#highlights

    oh my, that Etro suit. I’m salivating.

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    Sarvi @Sarvi

    Oh, and here’s an interesting discussion of the controversies behind awards for children’s books (who knew?) that I came across while looking for a book on William Blake for my child. I sharply disagree with some parts of this piece but I do like that it asks questions more than it offers pat answers:

    http://www.hbook.com/2016/07/choosing-books/horn-book-magazine/2015-in-review-the-year-in-words/

    “To what extent can we trust child readers to truly understand potentially problematic texts? What is right for them and what is wrong for them? What is censorship and what is judicious editing and selection? “

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    Sarvi @Sarvi

    I heard this interesting program a while back: http://www.npr.org/programs/invisibilia/483855073/the-problem-with-the-solution

    I was struck by the thorn in the heart of it: that our desire to help those close to us who are suffering, our emotional investment in their wellbeing, may be the very thing that makes us unfit to help.

    More on the remarkable town of Geel, where the mentally ill live for decades as boarders in the homes of hosts:

    http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2016/07/01/484083305/for-centuries-a-small-town-has-embraced-strangers-with-mental-illness

    LINK
    Sarvi @Sarvi

    This is now pretty far off topic but this link was so interesting: http://www.ikatbag.com/2014/03/subtelties-in-drafting-sleeves.html

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 1,915 total)

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