Oliver + S

Lightning McStitch

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    Lightning McStitch @LightningMcStitch

    Hi Bonnie, I’ve only ever made the jacket in stretch fabrics and from memory I’ve just used a straight stitch everywhere. I’d certainly use a single straight stitch at the shoulder dart so they press flat more easily.

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    Lightning McStitch @LightningMcStitch

    Hi Figen, as one without much “up front” my experience with bust measurements is limited, but:
    I believe the bust measurements as per the chart will be the B cup.
    A nice shirt fit is often all about the shoulders, so I’d suggest choosing your size based on your upper bust measurement and then using the C cup pattern tissue which saves you having to do an FBA.

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    Lightning McStitch @LightningMcStitch

    Hi Paige. Because the front placket helps to form the collar it needs to be wide enough that there’s no chance it will roll out or fold on itself.
    It certainly works out very nicely if you sew it as instructed, so my suggestion is not to worry and let it happen. Enjoy the sewing

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    Lightning McStitch @LightningMcStitch

    Hi Liz, the breezy blouse is lovely, but it’s very essence is its sleevelessness, no?
    Adding a sleeve to a sleeveless pattern is tricky. I’d focus on going the other way:
    What is it you like about the breezy blouse?
    It would be much easier to copy the neckline, the side panel blocking or the hem shape onto another pattern that already had sleeves.
    There’s a Lisette woven tee pattern with a standard set in sleeve that springs to mind as a blank canvas that you could then turn into something more like a breezy blouse.
    Does that make sense? It seems the path of least resistance to me.

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    Lightning McStitch @LightningMcStitch

    Hi Violet,
    There’s a sew along for this pattern on the blog. Perhaps this will help: https://oliverands.com/community/blog/2016/02/gallery-tunic-dress-sew-along.html

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    Lightning McStitch @LightningMcStitch

    Is it possible you’re trying to attach the wrong side of the armhole facing?

    Maybe you could add a picture to help illustrate what’s going wrong

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    Lightning McStitch @LightningMcStitch

    Hi Katie,

    The front of the Cappuccino dress is a bit tricky as it’s made up of three pattern pieces.

    Do you like the current fit and dress length but want to raise the pockets on the dress?

    Or do you want to shorten the whole dress? Then the question becomes where? Through the body or at the hem or both?

    Sliding the pockets up the dress without changing the dress shape or length would be fairly easy.

    Have a look at this blog post

    shelley’s gallery-cappuccino dress


    Where I’ve made miniature cellophane pattern pieces. With the cappuccino dress front pattern pieces laid out as they’d be sewn you can imagine how you’d slide the pockets up and redraw a few lines.

    Using the see through “trace and toile” type interfacing is really good for this kind of thing.

    I hope that helps to visualise what you need to do.
    Shelley

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    Lightning McStitch @LightningMcStitch

    I haven’t sewn the Marais dress (yet) so take the following with a grain of salt, but here’s what I’d do if I wanted to add a sleeve:

    Choose the knit pattern that you like the sleeve/armscye of; eg metro T, or the Easton, or the Belgravia dress, etc

    Trace both patterns in your size and find the centre front line (it’s the fold line for the metro and Easton, but a bit trickier for the Belgravia).
    Overlay the bodice pieces of the pattern with sleeves over the pattern without (Marais) and then make a third tracing that blends from one pattern to the other.

    Then you can just do some Building Block style fiddles to turn the sleeve into what you want.
    Does that make sense?
    It’s much easier than trying to adjust an armscye that was not designed for a sleeve.

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    Lightning McStitch @LightningMcStitch

    I would do both equally. Remember, even a little bit makes a difference, a 1/4″ off inner and outer will make a full 1″ reduction in circumference.
    They’re a relatively slim/straight leg fit anyway. Are you sure you want them narrower? Using a trace and Toile interfacing you can “tissue fit” the pattern. Just sew the one leg pattern pieces front and back and then try them on the kid, while they impersonate a flamingo!

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    Lightning McStitch @LightningMcStitch

    Hi @lillypilly I use Trace and Toile all the time too.
    You know what I often find is I accidentally have a piece of tracing upside down, then the grain lines don’t match!
    For that reason I always trace the wording on the pattern piece as well

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    Lightning McStitch @LightningMcStitch

    🙂
    Sure, but be warned the sewing queue is long! I’ve got three bear suits and a Goldilocks dress to sew for next month’s Melburn-Roobaix

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    Lightning McStitch @LightningMcStitch

    For clarity sake, can you say whether you were printing the A4/letter version, or 36″ wide roll, or A0 standard paper sheets.

    If someone tries to fit the US 36″ wide (darn you US rebels) to an international standard A0 sheet the scaling could easily end up whacked.

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    Lightning McStitch @LightningMcStitch

    I haven’t done it, but I have often wondered about just this.
    The only thing you’d need to consider is whether you want it to close when worn on its own.
    I’m not sure, from memory, if the front edges of the vest actually meet at centre front. If not, you might need to add some to the centre front and then maybe add a zipper and zip guard?

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    Lightning McStitch @LightningMcStitch

    Hi Catherine, this blog post will probably answer all your questions:

    finding your correct pattern size

    You’re right that you want to choose your size according to your upper bust/shoulder size then use the cup sizes feature to account for your bust
    (As a square shouldered B-cupper I speak only from theory! 🙂 )

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    Lightning McStitch @LightningMcStitch

    Hi Nicole. Is it your intention not to line the jacket?
    If you’re using your quilted fabric on its own AND want the jacket to be reversible then yes, it would be super neat to unpick some of the quilting and make a two internal facing darts.
    Otherwise I’d just make the dart as directed, press it towards the back and even stitch it down with an edgestitch. That will flatten it a bit and add a kind of topstitched coat look!
    Sounds like a great little garment!

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 1,060 total)

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